Preservation Portfolio

Historic preservation involves more than restoring old buildings and historic sites. This process is interconnected to the strength and sustainability of our communities. Historic preservation displays the heritage that gives our neighborhoods unique character and personality while providing the opportunity for new economic vitality.

Saint Thomas Episcopal Church Conditions Assessment

Location:
Liberty Street
Bath, NY 14810

Budget:
$850,000

Summary:
Johnson-Schmidt & Associates was contracted to assess conditions and prioritize repairs. Our work will be used to apply for grant funds.

John W. Jones Museum

Location:
Davis Street, Elmira, NY 14901

Budget:
$850,000 (Multi-phased)

Summary:
This was the home of the abolitionist, John W. Jones, which had been heavily modified for use as a rental house. A not-for-profit organization was created to champion its restoration for use as a museum. The first phase of the project included a complete historic structure report (HSR), including the conservation of original wallpapers and the restoration of its original porch. The second phase included the structural stabilization and exterior restoration, which is currently nearing completion.

Chautauqua Institution Design Review Consultation

Location:
Chautauqua Institution, Chautauqua, NY

Budget:
N/A

Summary:
The Architectural Review Board (ARB) at Chautauqua Institution hired Johnson-Schmidt & Associates to provide design guidance to the Institution and the Architects for this project, which had been proposed numerous times over a 20 year period. A design solution was finally achieved for this significant resource at Chautauqua, proposed by Elise Johnson-Schmidt, and it was constructed in 2008.

The ARB has hired Johnson-Schmidt & Associates on numerous occasions for solutions to difficult design challenges.

Restoration of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Station

Location:
Jct. Steuben St. & Victory Highway, Painted Post, NY

Budget:
N/A

Summary:
This former train station was underutilized as a storage facility for the DPW. Elise Johnson-Schmidt chaired a committee to find a new use for the building; listed it on the National Register; raised money for its total restoration through grants she wrote; and was the architect of record for its restoration as a donation by Market Street Restoration Agency. Its interior was finally reconstructed and is now used as the Erwin-Painted Post Museum of local history.

Trinity Episcopal Church Steeple Restoration

Location:
304 North Main St., Elmira, NY 14901

Budget:
$175,000

Summary:
Trinity Episcopal Church hired Johnson-Schmidt & Associates to evaluate the condition of the church’s exterior masonry. The condition of the steeple was found to be in peril of losing the upper portion including the cross (which was poorly attached to the failed masonry). The steeple was stabilized for the winter, the cross removed and the following spring, the steeple was deconstructed and restored.

The Park Church

Location:
208 West Gray Street, Elmira, NY

Budget:
$1,500,000

Summary:
The Park Church is an extremely significant structure in Elmira, NY due to its architectural character and history. The roof of the building, including a previously slate mansard lower roof and elaborate metal cornice, had deteriorated, requiring a major restoration. Its massive size required the project to be completed in two phases and work is currently underway.

YMCA

Location:
Corning, NY

Budget:
N/A

Summary:
The Corning Family YMCA engaged Johnson-Schmidt & Associates to conduct a condition assessment of the historic Armory that forms the core of its facility. The report is a fundamental document for the Y's facilities planning and will furnish critical information for applications for historic preservation grants.

Mount Saviour Monastery

Location:
Pine City

Budget:
$150,000 but came in under budget at $117,130

Summary:
The Brothers of Mount Saviour Monastery occupy a campus designed by Architect Ron Cassetti and constructed in 1962.

The Chapel, Commissary, Library and Dormitory were separated by a connector on the first floor, however there was no indoor connection. As the monks at Mount Saviour age, their ability to traverse this path in the winter was compromised, and handicapped accessibility was also difficult. An addition was designed to blend with the historic 1962 campus, utilizing the vocabulary of the existing buildings to maintain the original intent and integrity of Cassetti’s original design. Johnson-Schmidt & Associates was challenged to create a connector that although unheated, provided reasonable comfort and protection from the elements, as well as accessibility to portions of the campus facilities.